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Trustworthy Leaders Book

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Trustworthy Leaders is a short study in the characteristics and skills shared by effective leaders in business, sports, government, and military endeavors. It draws upon the thoughts of proven leaders, past and present, to identify the attitudes and actions which underlie the development of trust between leaders and team members. The objective of this book is to help bridge the gap for those who have not had the advantage of careful study. The focus of this work is on age-old leadership principles, traits, and skills rather than some avant-garde view of leading. Includes TECHSTAR Personality Profile worksheet and analysis.

This textbook is used for TECHSTAR's leadership courses.


CONTENTS

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii
The Nature of Leading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
1. A Matter of Trust . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
2. Character: A Foundation for Trust . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
3. Adversity: The Forge of Character . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Trust-Building Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
4. Honesty: The Cornerstone of Character . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
5. Technical Competence: A Qualification for Coaching . . . . . . . . . . 23
6. Inspiration: Breathing Life into the Team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
7. Visibility: A Leader I Can See . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
8. Unselfishness: A Team-Serving Attitude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
9. Humility: Modesty of Spirit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
10. Communication: Painting Clear Pictures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
11. Justness: A Fair and Objective View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
12. Consistency: Walking the Talk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
13. Respect: A Two-Way Street . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
14. Decisiveness: Someone Has to Make Choices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
15. Loyalty: Keeping Faith with the Team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
16. Courage: Commitment to Do Right . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Trust-Building Skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
17. Understanding Your Role . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
18. Knowing Yourself . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
19. Motivating the Team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
20. Balancing People and Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
21. Caring for the Team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
22. Using Power and Influence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
23. Navigating the Corporate Terrain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
24. Disciplining the Team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
25. Encouraging Criticism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
Building Trustworthy Teams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
26. A Team Approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
27. Ingredients of a Team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
28. Steps in Building a Team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
29. Characteristics of Good Team Members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
30. The Team Feeling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
 
Appendix A
 
TECHSTAR Personality Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Temperament Questionnaire Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Temperament Questionnaire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
TECHSTAR Personality Scorecard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
 
Appendix B
 
Leading Principles Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
 
Appendix C
 
Trust-Breaker Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
End Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Helpful Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Helpful Films . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
About the Author . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inside Back Cover
 

LIST OF FIGURES

 
1-1 Credibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
1-2 Earning and Losing Trust . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
1-3 Total Trustworthiness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
8-1 Whom Do I Serve? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
17-1 Functions of a Leader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
18-1 Task vs. People . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
18-2 Rationalvs. Emotional . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
18-3 Four Basic Quadrants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
18-4 Quadrant Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
18-5 TECHSTAR Personality Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
18-6 TECHSTAR Personality Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
18-7 TECHSTAR Personality Scorecard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
20-1 Coaching for Superior Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
20-2 The Managerial Grid® . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
23-1 Triangulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
23-2 Tactical Midpoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
24-1 The Discipline Cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
28-1 The Ten P's of Project Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
A-1 TECHSTAR Personality Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
A-2 TECHSTAR Personality Scorecard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171

Introduction

IN 1931, a young Army major by the name of George S. Patton, Jr., intrigued with the study of humans in conflict and the effect of leadership on their behavior, authored a text entitled Success in War. Within its pages, he wrote:

Our means of studying war have increased as much as have our tools for waging it, but it is an open question whether this increase in means has not perhaps obscured or obliterated one essential detail, namely, the necessity for personal leadership.

Patton had learned through hard experience that technological affluence profits little if an organization is destitute in leadership. Leaders, he knew, are the structural center of a team, the hub around which the organizational wheel is built, and the catalyst to an alchemy of human ingredients, without which the powerful potion known as team cannot be brewed. He went on to build the Third Army, a formidable fighting force whose WWII exploits were feared by the enemy and cheered by Americans at home and overseas.

What was Patton's secret? He was a team-forger-a leader with the ability to fashion individuals into a tool more powerful than the sum of its individual parts. Yet Patton's experience is not unique, nor is the military in sole possession of Patton's wisdom. Pat Riley, former head coach of the Los Angeles Lakers, New York Knickerbockers, and currently with the Miami Heat, has made a career of transforming professional basketball teams from disconnected under performers to finely tuned, well-orchestrated teams. In The Winner Within, Riley tells of his appointment as head coach to a flagging Los Angeles Lakers team in 1981. Though the Lakers' roster read like a Who's Who of basketball luminaries (Kareem Abdul-Jabar, Magic Johnson, James Worthy, et al.), they just weren't playing as a team. With the guidance of Coach Riley and the hard work of each member of the team, the Lakers regained their championship form and went on to become a formidable basketball dynasty, ruling the court for most of the 1980s. Lest we believe that Coach Riley just had a lucky streak, he has proven himself to the task twice more at the professional level. Riley left the Lakers in 1990. After a stint as color commentator, he assumed head coaching duties for the New York Knickerbockers. Again, great players, but no synergy. Under the tutelage of Riley, they became playoff contenders within a year, losing to the Bulls by only a single game. Leaving the Knicks in 1994, he accepted the head coaching position of the Miami Heat, another struggling team. Same story. Within a year, the Heat had become a playoff contender. Resuming coaching duties with the Heat again in 2005, he led them to an NBA championship. Riley, too, is a team-forger. In The Winner Within, he wrote:

If there's one thing on which I'm an authority, it's how to blend the talents and strengths of individuals into a force that becomes greater than the sum of its parts. My driving belief is this: great teamwork is the only way to reach our ultimate moments, to create the breakthroughs that define our careers, to fulfill our lives with a sense of lasting significance.

These are not new words. Any student of leadership reads them again and again, in historical studies as well as modern day recitations of the art called leading. Great leaders in government, business, the armed forces, and sports all learn that distinguished accomplishments come from teams, and superb teams are the reflections of exceptional leaders-leaders who don't just energize teams, but who synergize them. If leadership is so important in building teams, you would assume that the study of leadership would occupy a central position in both the development of potential leaders and the continued refinement of those already in leadership positions. Instead, in most business environments, leadership studies are rarely included, especially for the first line leaders who need them most. Junior leaders are expected either to have or somehow to acquire the necessary characteristics and skills to lead effectively. Indeed, those who have demonstrated expertise as technicians or engineers are frequently thrust into the ranks of leadership in a "sink or swim" fashion which, all too often, results in a drowning. Not only is a team damaged in the process, but a potentially good leader may be set back years in development. Trustworthy Leaders is a short study in the characteristics and skills shared by effective leaders in business, sports, government, and military endeavors. It draws upon the thoughts of proven leaders, past and present, to identify the attitudes and actions which underlie the development of trust between leaders and team members. The objective of the work is to help bridge the gap for those who have not had the advantage of careful, organized study. The focus of this work is on age-old leadership principles, traits, and skills rather than some avant-garde view of leading. My experiences and studies have convinced me that there is no new or undiscovered method of leading. People are people, and influencing them to accomplish tasks within their respective environments is the crux of leading. Lord Baden-Powellor Juliette Gordon Low, Scouting's founders, would have taught us the same lessons. Since the ideas themselves are as old as humans and universally applicable to most leadership environments, the illustrations and quotations have been chosen to paint clear images rather than to achieve an artificial balance between races, sexes, or ages. As such, I have not attempted to make this work all things to all people. To have done so would have diluted the content and distracted from the theme. Instead, I have drawn on my own experiences-the same method by which each of us learns to lead-to illustrate the concepts presented in the book. As a result, you will find examples from sports, business, and the military. In that sense, this book is not strictly business. If you are not interested in sports, you may object to the use of sporting examples; yet the development of sports teams offers a unique opportunity to study leadership and its effect in a compressed time frame. To watch Coach Mike Krzyzewskiof the Duke Blue Devils or Coach Pat Summit of Tennessee's Lady Vols lead their teams in college basketball is a fascinating and instructional study in the art of leading. We see leadership in action as these great coaches use forceful behavior when appropriate while, at other times, choosing persuasive, gentle behavior as the most influential tool for the situation. Similarly, if you have no affiliation with the military community, you may object to the use of martial illustrations. Some believe that there is not a legitimate comparison between leading military organizations and business organizations.

Leading is an exercise in the acquisition and employment of power, not for the purpose of serving oneself, but for guiding a team toward accomplishment of an objective. The effectiveness of a leader is proportional to the leader's credibility in the eyes of the team. When a leader behaves in a fashion that engenders trust, team members are more likely to follow.

 


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